Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Cah Epidemiology Forecast

DelveInsight’s ‘Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH) – Epidemiology Forecast – 2032’ report delivers an in-depth understanding of the historical and forecasted epidemiology of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) in the United States, EU5 (Germany, Spain, Italy, France, and the United Kingdom), and Japan.

Geographies Covered

  • The United States
  • EU5 (Germany, France, Italy, Spain, and the United Kingdom)
  • Japan

Study Period: 2019–2032

Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH): Disease Understanding

Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH) Overview

According to National Organization for Rare Disorders, congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a group of rare inherited autosomal recessive disorders characterized by a deficiency of one of the enzymes needed to make specific hormones. CAH affects the adrenal glands located at the top of each kidney. Normally, the adrenal glands are responsible for producing three different hormones: corticosteroids, mineralocorticoids, and androgens.

  • Corticosteroids: steroid hormones that gauge the body’s response to illness or injury
  • Mineralocorticoids: steroid hormones that regulate salt and water levels
  • Androgens: male sex hormones

 

An enzyme deficiency will make the body unable to produce one or more of these hormones, resulting in the overproduction of another type of hormone precursor to compensate for the loss.

 

The most common cause of CAH is the absence of the enzyme 21-hydroxylase. Different mutations in the gene responsible for 21-hydroxylase result in different enzyme levels, producing a spectrum of effects. CAH due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency is responsible for 95% of all cases of CAH and is broken down further into two subcategories: classical CAH, which can be sub-divided into the salt-losing form or the simple-virilizing form, and non-classical CAH. Classical CAH is by far the more severe form and can result in adrenal crisis and death if not detected and treated. Non-classical CAH is milder and may or may not present symptoms. Since the absence of 21-hydroxylase makes the individuals unable to make the hormone cortisol and, in the case of salt-losing CAH, aldosterone, the body produces more androgens which cause a variety of symptoms, such as abnormal genital development in infant girls. There are other much rarer forms of CAH as well, including 11-Beta hydroxylase deficiency, 17a-hydroxylase deficiency, 3-Beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase deficiency, congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia, and p450 oxidoreductase deficiency which all present different symptoms. Although CAH is not curable, as long as patients receive adequate care and treatment, they can go on to lead normal lives.

 

The goal of medical treatment of CAH differs by the patient’s age. CAH is a recessive gene, so both the mother and father must be recessive carriers. Couples with recessive CAH genes may prevent CAH through preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH): Epidemiology

The congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) epidemiology division provides insights into the historical and current patient pool, along with the forecast trend for every seven major countries. It helps recognize the causes of current and forecasted trends by exploring numerous studies and views of key opinion leaders. This part of the report also provides the diagnosed patient pool and their trends, along with assumptions undertaken.

 

Key Findings

The disease epidemiology covered in the report provides historical and forecasted congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) epidemiology segmented as the Diagnosed Prevalence of Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia, Age-specific cases of Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia, Mutation based cases of Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia, and Type-specific cases of Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia. The report includes the prevalent scenario of Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH) in the 7MM covering the United States, EU5 countries (Germany, France, Italy, Spain, and the United Kingdom), and Japan from 2019 to 2032.

Country-wise Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH) Epidemiology

The epidemiology segment also provides the congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) epidemiology data and findings across the United States, EU5 (Germany, France, Italy, Spain, and the United Kingdom), and Japan.

  • The total diagnosed population of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) in the 7MM countries was close to 73,000 cases in 2021.
  • As per the estimates, the United States had the highest diagnosed prevalence of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) population in 2021. Among the EU5 countries, Germany had the highest diagnosed prevalent population of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) with nearly 8,000 cases, followed by France in 2021. On the other hand, Spain had the lowest diagnosed prevalent population of close to 4,300 cases in 2021.

Scope of the Report

  • Congenital adrenal hyperplasia report covers a detailed overview explaining its causes, symptoms and classification, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment patterns.
  • Congenital adrenal hyperplasia Epidemiology Report and Model provide an overview of the risk factors and global trends of Congenital adrenal hyperplasia in the seven major markets (7MM: US, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, UK, and Japan).
  • The report provides insight into the historical and forecasted patient pool of Congenital adrenal hyperplasia in seven major markets covering the United States, EU5 (Germany, Spain, France, Italy, UK), and Japan.
  • The report helps recognize the growth opportunities in the 7MM concerning the patient population.
  • The report assesses the disease risk and burden and highlights the unmet needs of congenital adrenal hyperplasia.
  • The report provides the segmentation of the congenital adrenal hyperplasia epidemiology by diagnosed prevalent cases of congenital adrenal hyperplasia in the 7MM.
  • The report provides the segmentation of the congenital adrenal hyperplasia epidemiology by Age-specific cases of congenital adrenal hyperplasia in the 7MM.
  • The report provides the segmentation of the congenital adrenal hyperplasia epidemiology by Mutation based cases of congenital adrenal hyperplasia in the 7MM.
  • The report provides the segmentation of the congenital adrenal hyperplasia epidemiology by types-specific cases of congenital adrenal hyperplasia in the 7MM.

Report Highlights

  • 11-year Forecast of congenital adrenal hyperplasia epidemiology
  • 7MM Coverage
  • Prevalent cases of congenital adrenal hyperplasia
  • Type-specific cases of congenital adrenal hyperplasia
  • Age-specific cases of congenital adrenal hyperplasia
  • Mutation based cases of congenital adrenal hyperplasia

KOL Views

We interview KOLs and obtain SME’s opinions through primary research to fill the data gaps and validate our secondary research. The opinion helps understand the total patient population and current treatment pattern. This will support the clients in potential upcoming novel treatments by identifying the overall scenario of the indications.

Key Questions Answered

  • What are the major factors that will drive the change in patient population in congenital adrenal hyperplasia during the forecast period (2019–2032)?
  • What are the key findings pertaining to the congenital adrenal hyperplasia epidemiology across 7MM, and which country will have the highest number of patients during the forecast period (2019–2032)?
  • What would be the total number of patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia across the 7MM during the forecast period (2019–2032)?
  • Among the EU5 countries, which country will have the highest number of patients during the forecast period (2019–2032)?
  • At what CAGR is the patient population expected to grow in the 7MM forecast period (2019–2032)?
  • What are the disease risk, burdens, and unmet needs of congenital adrenal hyperplasia?
  • What are the currently available treatments for congenital adrenal hyperplasia?

Reasons to buy

Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH) Epidemiology report will allow the user to:

  • Develop business strategies by understanding the trends shaping and driving the global congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) market
  • Quantify patient populations in the global congenital adrenal hyperplasia market to improve product design, pricing, and launch plans
  • Understand the magnitude of the congenital adrenal hyperplasia population by its diagnosed prevalent cases.
  • Understand the magnitude of the congenital adrenal hyperplasia population by its age-specific cases.
  • Understand the magnitude of the congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) population by its type-specific cases of congenital adrenal hyperplasia.
  • Understand the magnitude of the congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) population by its mutation-based cases of congenital adrenal hyperplasia.
  • The congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) epidemiology report and model were written and developed by Masters and PhD level epidemiologists
  • The congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) Epidemiology Model developed by DelveInsight is easy to navigate, interactive with dashboards, and epidemiology based on transparent and consistent methodologies. Moreover, the model supports the data presented in the report and showcases disease trends over an 11-year forecast period using reputable sources

Key Assessments

  • Patient Segmentation
  • Disease Risk and Burden
  • Risk of disease by the segmentation
  • Factors driving growth in a specific patient population

1. Key Insights

2. Report Introduction

3. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Overview at a Glance

3.1. Market Share (%) Distribution of Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia in 2019

3.2. Market Share (%) Distribution of Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia in 2032

4. Executive Summary

5. Disease Background and Overview

5.1. Introduction

5.2. Classification

5.3. Causes

5.4. Signs and Symptoms

5.5. Pathophysiology

5.6. Clinical features

5.7. Diagnosis

5.8. Treatment

5.8.1. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Due to Steroid 21-Hydroxylase Deficiency: An Endocrine Society* Clinical Practice Guideline

6. Epidemiology and Patient Population

6.1. Key Findings

6.2. 7MM Total Diagnosed Prevalence of CAH

6.3. Assumptions and Rationale

6.4. The United States

6.4.1. Diagnosed Prevalence of CAH in the United States

6.4.2. Age-specific cases of CAH in the United States

6.4.3. Mutations based cases of CAH in the United States

6.4.4. Type-specific cases of Classical CAH in the United States

6.5. EU5

6.5.1. Total Diagnosed Prevalence of CAH in EU5

6.5.2. Germany

6.5.3. Age-specific cases of CAH in Germany

6.5.4. Mutations based cases of CAH in Germany

6.5.5. Type-specific cases of Classical CAH in Germany

6.5.6. France

6.5.7. Age-specific cases of CAH in France

6.5.8. Mutations based cases of CAH in France

6.5.9. Type-specific cases of Classical CAH in France

6.5.10. Italy

6.5.11. Age-specific cases of CAH in Italy

6.5.12. Mutations based cases of CAH in Italy

6.5.13. Type-specific cases of Classical CAH in Italy

6.5.14. Spain

6.5.15. Age-specific cases of CAH in Spain

6.5.16. Mutations based cases of CAH in Spain

6.5.17. Type-specific cases of Classical CAH in Spain

6.5.18. The United Kingdom

6.5.19. Age-specific cases of CAH in the United Kingdom

6.5.20. Mutations based cases of CAH in the United Kingdom

6.5.21. Type-specific cases of Classical CAH in the United Kingdom

6.6. Japan

6.6.1. Diagnosed Prevalence of CAH in Japan

6.6.2. Age-specific cases of CAH in Japan

6.6.3. Mutations based cases of CAH in Japan

6.6.4. Type-specific cases of Classical CAH in Japan

7. Patient Journey

8. KOL Views

9. SWOT Analysis

10. Unmet Needs

11. Appendix

11.1. Bibliography

11.2. Report Methodology

12. DelveInsight Capabilities

13. Disclaimer

14. About DelveInsight

List of Table

Table 1: Summary of Congenital adrenal hyperplasia, Epidemiology, and Key Events (2019 to 2032)

Table 2: Clinical Features in Individuals with Classic and Non-classic CAH

Table 3: Summary of the Clinical, Hormonal, and Genetic Features of Steroidogenic Defects

Table 4: Diagnosis of 21-OHD CAH after Infancy Based on 17 OHP Levels

Table 5: Molecular Genetic Testing Used in 21-Hydroxylase-Deficient Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

Table 6: Enzyme Deficiencies Resulting in CAH

Table 7: Treatment Guidelines

Table 8: Diagnosed Prevalence of CAH in the 7MM (2019 to 2032)

Table 9: Diagnosed Prevalence of CAH in the United States (2019 to 2032)

Table 10: Age-specific cases of CAH in the United States (2019 to 2032)

Table 11: Mutations based cases of CAH in the United States (2019 to 2032)

Table 12: Type-specific cases of Classical CAH in the United States (2019 to 2032)

Table 13: Total Diagnosed Prevalence of CAH in EU5 (2019 to 2032)

Table 14: Age-specific cases of CAH in Germany (2019 to 2032)

Table 15: Mutations based cases of CAH in Germany (2019 to 2032)

Table 16: Type-specific cases of Classical CAH in Germany (2019 to 2032)

Table 17: Age-specific cases of CAH in France (2019 to 2032)

Table 18: Mutations based cases of CAH in France (2019 to 2032)

Table 19: Type-specific cases of Classical CAH in France (2019 to 2032)

Table 20: Age-specific cases of CAH in Italy (2019 to 2032)

Table 21: Mutations based cases of CAH in Italy (2019 to 2032)

Table 22: Type-specific cases of Classical CAH in Italy (2019 to 2032)

Table 23: Age-specific cases of CAH in Spain (2019 to 2032)

Table 24: Mutations based cases of CAH in Spain (2019 to 2032)

Table 25: Type-specific cases of Classical CAH in Spain (2019 to 2032)

Table 26: Age-specific cases of CAH in the United Kingdom (2019 to 2032)

Table 27: Mutations based cases of CAH in the United Kingdom (2019 to 2032)

Table 28: Type-specific cases of Classical CAH in the United Kingdom (2019 to 2032)

Table 29: Diagnosed Prevalence of CAH in Japan (2019 to 2032)

Table 30: Age-specific cases of CAH in Japan (2019 to 2032)

Table 31: Mutations based cases of CAH in Japan (2019 to 2032)

Table 32: Type-specific cases of Classical CAH in Japan (2019 to 2032)

List of Figures

Figure 1: Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

Figure 2: Classification of CAH

Figure 3: Inheritance of an Autosomal Recessive Disorder from Carrier Parents

Figure 4: Adrenal Steroidogenesis

Figure 5: Different degrees of virilization according to the scale developed by Prader

Figure 6: Total Diagnosed Prevalent Population of CAH in 7MM (2019 to 2032)

Figure 7: Diagnosed Prevalence of CAH in the United States (2019 to 2032)

Figure 8: Age-specific cases of CAH in the United States (2019 to 2032)

Figure 9: Mutations based cases of CAH in the United States (2019 to 2032)

Figure 10: Type-specific cases of Classical CAH in the United States (2019 to 2032)

Figure 11: Total Diagnosed Prevalent Population of CAH in EU5 (2019 to 2032)

Figure 12: Age-specific cases of CAH in Germany (2019 to 2032)

Figure 13: Mutations based cases of CAH in Germany (2019 to 2032)

Figure 14: Type-specific cases of Classical CAH in Germany (2019 to 2032)

Figure 15: Age-specific cases of CAH in France (2019 to 2032)

Figure 16: Mutations based cases of CAH in France (2019 to 2032)

Figure 17: Type-specific cases of Classical CAH in France (2019 to 2032)

Figure 18: Age-specific cases of CAH in Italy (2019 to 2032)

Figure 19: Mutations based cases of CAH in Italy (2019 to 2032)

Figure 20: Type-specific cases of Classical CAH in Italy (2019 to 2032)

Figure 21: Age-specific cases of CAH in Spain (2019 to 2032)

Figure 22: Mutations based cases of CAH in Spain (2019 to 2032)

Figure 23: Type-specific cases of Classical CAH in Spain (2019 to 2032)

Figure 24: Age-specific cases of CAH in the United Kingdom (2019 to 2032)

Figure 25: Mutations based cases of CAH in the United Kingdom (2019 to 2032)

Figure 26: Type-specific cases of Classical CAH in the United Kingdom (2019 to 2032)

Figure 27: Diagnosed Prevalence of CAH in Japan (2019 to 2032)

Figure 28: Age-specific cases of CAH in Japan (2019 to 2032)

Figure 29: Mutations based cases of CAH in Japan (2019 to 2032)

Figure 30: Type-specific cases of Classical CAH in Japan (2019 to 2032)

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